Review: Beam Me Up, Scotty

Beam Me Up, Scotty
Beam Me Up, Scotty by James Doohan
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

One of the better autobiographies I’ve read recently. It doesn’t hurt that it is about such a cool individual as James Doohan, either. There’s not a lot of whining and whinging in it, either – James Doohan relates his life, his career and the advantages (and disadvantages) of fame very succinctly. Well-written by comic book and Star Trek scribe Peter David, this one is a fun afternoon read.

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Review: New Life and New Civilizations: Exploring Star Trek Comics

New Life and New Civilizations: Exploring Star Trek Comics
New Life and New Civilizations: Exploring Star Trek Comics by Joseph F. Berenato
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Very detailed book on the various versions of the Star Trek comic books over the years, beginning with the Gold Key series in the late sixties to the current IDW series featuring the revamped Trek crew of the new movies. It even covers the comic books of the Peter Pan records from the seventies and the foreshortened comic strip that was to promote the first movie. A wealth of information, much of which from the actual people involved with the comics. Definitely worth a read if you want to know how a licensed property gets into four-color.

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Review: Funny Comics: Jiggs “Bringing up Father” Vol. 3 Book


Funny Comics: Jiggs “Bringing up Father” Vol. 3 Book by Babette Lansing
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is a great compilation of the original comic strip “Bringing Up Father”, probably better known as “Maggie and Jiggs” to a couple of past generations of readers. These are originally from the late 1920’s, and the ones in this book cover the time period around Black Tuesday, the Stock Market Crash of 1929 that caused the Great Depression. Jiggs has lost most of the fortune he won, but Maggie still wants to walk in high society and her husband just wants some corned beef and cabbage and some peace.

The reproduction is excellent on these, and the panel-per-page works nice for any Kindle device – you can see the loving detail McManus put into his art.

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Review: Funny Comics: Jiggs “Bringing up Father” Vol. 2 Book


Funny Comics: Jiggs “Bringing up Father” Vol. 2 Book by Babette Lansing
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is a great compilation of the original comic strip “Bringing Up Father”, probably better known as “Maggie and Jiggs” to a couple of past generations of readers. These are originally from the 1920’s; this one covers some of Jigg’s attempt to become of Hollywood mogul when he buys a crappy film studio on the advice of one of his “friends”.

The reproduction is excellent on these, and the panel-per-page works nice for any Kindle device – you can see the loving detail McManus put into his art.

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Review: Funny Comics: Jiggs “Bringing up Father” Vol. 1 Book


Funny Comics: Jiggs “Bringing up Father” Vol. 1 Book by Babette Lansing
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This is a great compilation of the original comic strip “Bringing Up Father”, probably better known as “Maggie and Jiggs” to a couple of past generations of readers. These are originally from the 1920’s; this one covers some of Jigg’s standard pitfalls in just trying to get out of the house and down to Dinty’s for a little fun. The reproduction is excellent on these, and the panel-per-page works nice for any Kindle device – you can see the loving detail McManus put into his art.

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Review: The N.E.D.O.R. Agents Volume 1: The Everlasting Battle

The N.E.D.O.R. Agents Volume 1: The Everlasting Battle
The N.E.D.O.R. Agents Volume 1: The Everlasting Battle by Will Meugniot
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

A great take on some old comic book heroes that many might remember but haven’t been published regularly since the late forties.

Nedor, for the uninitiated, was one of the comic imprints of Standard Publications back in the day, responsible for comics like Exciting Comics, Startling Comics, the Black Terror, the Fighting Yank, and America’s Best Comics. Besides the forementioned Terror and Yank, Pyroman, Captain Future, the American Crusader, the Grim Reaper and Madame Masque were spotlight stars in many of the books.

Nearly all of the Nedor characters have since lapsed into the public domain, and have actually been used by other companies; Project Superpowers and Terra Obscura have been the more well-known examples of this. This particular book reprints some adventures of Bill Black’s Femforce that utilized the characters, created by noted animator and good-girl art master Will Meugniot.

There are some new characters added, like PyroGirl, Candi Future and the Thought Collective, many set up as the children of the original heroes (many of which are still active). The story, besides being a showcase for Meugniot’s artwork, is actually a pretty good tale – very modern (though set in 1965) and having all the aplomb of those original comic book tales of the forties. And if good-girl art is on your list of guilty pleasures … well, Will Meugniot is right up there with Dave Stevens on that point.

My only complaint: It ends in the middle of the second story arc. Now I’m either gonna have to search out some Femforce issues (which I was amazed to find was still being published intermittently) or wait for the next collection!

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Review: Fantastic Four/Inhumans

Fantastic Four/Inhumans
Fantastic Four/Inhumans by Carlos Pacheco
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

I think this book would’ve been a lot better without the addition of the four issues of Fantastic Four. The Inhumans don’t really play that big of a role in that story (which features the birth of Reed and Sue Richards’ daughter Valeria).

The four issues of the Inhumans limited series were much better, especially art-wise, with Lucas and Ladronn’s very European artwork. To me, it was very reminiscent of Jean Giraud or Barry Windsor-Smith. The story was more interesting, but I’m betting your average comic book reader won’t enjoy it, since there’s a lot of text to read and it’s considerably more compressed than most modern story arcs.

The Inhumans is a difficult title to write or even read some days, considering when they’re based around Earth, stories are pretty much limited to Attilan or some interaction with the FF, and anything else is on a grand cosmic scale (which the limited series reprinted here approaches). And with current Marvel continuity thrusting the Inhumans into modern Earth society (in the Inhumanity crossover), thing will probably get more confusing than ever.

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