Review: Descercrations

Descercrations
Descercrations by Karina Michaels
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

Ah, curiosity. You’ll kill more than felines, won’t you? I was so curious as to how someone could’ve possibly misspelled the title of their book both on the front cover and in the Amazon listing that I broke down and spent the 99-cents and bought it. Even at that low price, it was a waste of money and the hour it took to read was one that I’ll never get back.

This story is like someone watched an episode of Downton Abbey at the same time as an episode of The Only Way is Essex while a special combo of Fear Factor and Jersey Shore was playing in the background. That’s really the only way I can describe it – it’s so bloody horrible that it’s beyond belief. Incest, racial stereotypes that only pop up when the author needs to indicate a character is not white, long and almost Joycean-length expositions, and a constant “tell” attitude toward the story; Instead of showing the reader through character interaction, the author just drones on in a bevy of viewpoint-changing narration that puts one into a mood for napping or speed reading to just trudge through the inanity.

The book’s even formatting poorly – it’s practically backwards, as the first paragraph of each chapter is indented, but none of the others are, giving a reader a headache. Which on top of the book’s other crimes add up to a literary migraine. Unless you’re a masochist of the highest order, I’d avoid this one.

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Review: The Final Nexus

The Final Nexus
The Final Nexus by Gene DeWeese
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

While there is a bit too much narration and exposition in the book, this was an enjoyable read. The regular Trek crew were all pretty wooden and rote in terms of characterization (especially Spock and McCoy) but the new character of Lt. Ansfield is a strong and unique one, and I hope to see her in other books. Older folks wanting adventure in the 23rd century is not something that has been adequately explored in the Trek Universe.

Also, be forewarned that this is a continuation of another novel subset (Chain of Attack), in which the concept of the Nexus and the gates were introduced. You don’t really need to read those, but I think if I had, perhaps the gravitas of the situation would’ve been a bit more telling.

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Review: Star Trek Log Six

Star Trek Log Six
Star Trek Log Six by Alan Dean Foster
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This was definitely one of the better volumes of this series, with stories based on the Animated Star Trek series. I think the three episodes adapted in this one are easily comparable to the Original Series. “Albatross” is the best of the three, reading like a regular episode. The other two, “The Practical Joker” and “Sharper Than a Serpent’s Tooth” have some flaws, but could’ve easily been third season shows.

I think the only problem with the Star Trek Logs is that for some reason, the characterization seems about as wooden as the animation was in the shows, which is strange considering Alan Dean Foster is doing the writing. I have been enjoying the extra emphasis, when allowed, on Arex and M’Ress. The third tale introduces Walking Bear, a backup navigator and Native American descendant. I’m sure he was a story-specific throwaway character, but he at least had a bit of personality.

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Review: Pow-Wows: Long Lost Friend, a Collection of Mysteries and Invaluable Arts and Remedies

Pow-Wows: Long Lost Friend, a Collection of Mysteries and Invaluable Arts and Remedies
Pow-Wows: Long Lost Friend, a Collection of Mysteries and Invaluable Arts and Remedies by John George Hohman
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

Seriously one of the biggest pieces of crap I’ve had the misfortune to read. The eschatologist in me enjoys reading some religious texts, but this Pow-wows junk makes even less sense than normal religion. Referencing “Christian Gypsy Kings of Egypt” and providing spells and charms for stopping bleeding (none of which include things like applying pressure or anything remotely logical) and preventing “mortification” (gangrene) and “calumnification” (slander) … well, I realize this was written in a different, harsher era, but who would believe this?

Supposedly these morons still roam the “wilds” of Pennsylvania, preying on the believing and the short-of-common-sense crowd. I’m thinking anyone who gets taken by them probably deserves it, since if you want to believe such a assinine mishmash of Catholic, Protestant, and Roma “beliefs”, it’s on your head what happens to you.

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Review: Pow-Wows: Long Lost Friend, a Collection of Mysteries and Invaluable Arts and Remedies

Pow-Wows: Long Lost Friend, a Collection of Mysteries and Invaluable Arts and Remedies
Pow-Wows: Long Lost Friend, a Collection of Mysteries and Invaluable Arts and Remedies by John George Hohman
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

Seriously one of the biggest pieces of crap I’ve had the misfortune to read. The eschatologist in me enjoys reading some religious texts, but this Pow-wows junk makes even less sense than normal religion. Referencing “Christian Gypsy Kings of Egypt” and providing spells and charms for stopping bleeding (none of which include things like applying pressure or anything remotely logical) and preventing “mortification” (gangrene) and “calumnification” (slander) … well, I realize this was written in a different, harsher era, but who would believe this?

Supposedly these morons still roam the “wilds” of Pennsylvania, preying on the believing and the short-of-common-sense crowd. I’m thinking anyone who gets taken by them probably deserves it, since if you want to believe such a assinine mishmash of Catholic, Protestant, and Roma “beliefs”, it’s on your head what happens to you.

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Review: The Fifth Woman

The Fifth Woman
The Fifth Woman by Henning Mankell
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

This novel in the Wallander series was a strange beast; there was more characterization and backstory about Wallander than we’ve really gotten before, and some pivotal life events happen to him, but the mystery itself was pretty misbegotten: Horrific murders once again linked to another country. I’m getting the feeling that Sweden thinks that most evil comes from the outside world and not their picturesque nation.

It’s getting harder and harder to be motivated to read the next book in this series, but I’ll keep soldiering on, since I enjoy Nordic detectives.

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