Review: Warehouse 13 Volume 1 Tp

Warehouse 13 Volume 1 Tp
Warehouse 13 Volume 1 Tp by Ben Raab
My rating: 2 of 5 stars

First of all, I’m a big Warehouse 13 fan. Just finished binge-watching the whole series and it was a very enjoyable program. This review has absolutely NOTHING to do with the quality of the show.

This comic adaptation of the series was okay; just okay. It hit all the points of the TV series – lots of artifacts, a behind-the-scenes mastermind, the sense of family, a bit of history on the warehouse, a bronzing – but didn’t really add anything of note to the mythos. Another problem was that there was a different artist handling the book for each issue, so there wasn’t any consistency. I’d have to say that the final chapter, by Gordon Purcell, was the best one of the series. At least he knows how to handle a TV-based comic book, after working on Star Trek and numerous other franchise comics.

Oh, and the trade paperback is horribly overpriced; I see it on Amazon for $50-80 USD, and it is simply not worth it – at least not for what amounts to a fifteen-minute read. Get the comics instead if you’re interested in reading this.

View all my reviews

Advertisements

Review: Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Tales to Astonish, Vol. 1

Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Tales to Astonish, Vol. 1
Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Tales to Astonish, Vol. 1 by Stan Lee
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Another excellent reprint trade, featuring the first ten issues of Marvel’s Tales to Astonish, which would eventually become The Incredible Hulk’s second title. There are a lot of fun stories in here, by comic book legends like Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, Don Heck, Jack Davis, Paul Reinman, and others. This one is heavier on the giant monster plots than Tales of Suspense or Journey into Mystery.

Very enjoyable read for comic fans of any age!

View all my reviews

Review: Elementary: The Ghost Line

Elementary: The Ghost Line
Elementary: The Ghost Line by Adam Christopher
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I’ll have to say that this book read just like an episode of the Elementary TV show. The author had all the characterizations spot on, there was plenty of good detail in the descriptions, and it was a somewhat novel plot. And I enjoyed having Alonzo actually in on one of Holmes’ cases for once.

However, the only thing I really found lacking was that there wasn’t any additional background information, or even inferences, given to the characters. Most writers might take the opportunity to reveal some new quirks or some heretofore unknown background tidbits on the characters (or at least some of them), and there was really nothing new here. I suppose that’s the nature of the game, given that beyond the four main characters, the show’s NPCs get offed with regularity.

A rare beast as a good TV adaptation, this is definitely worth a read as both a bit of modern Holmesiana, and a fairly decent detective tale on it’s own. Don’t expect to solve it before Holmes’ inevitable climax though.

View all my reviews

Review: Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Tales of Suspense, Vol. 1

Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Tales of Suspense, Vol. 1
Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Tales of Suspense, Vol. 1 by Jack Kirby
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This Marvel Masterworks volume (one of the paperback versions) was a fun read, featuring the first 10 issues of Marvel’s Tales of Suspense, the comic that would eventually be home to Iron Man and later become Captain America’s title.

These stories are all more of a science fiction bent than the companion titles like Tales to Astonish or Strange Tales, but some of the monster or quirky stories fall into the groove here, too. There’s plenty of great artwork by artists that are legends: Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, Don Heck, John Buscema, Al Williamson.

Think of this as a comic book version of television’s The Twilight Zone, or perhaps Tales of Tomorrow. It will fill your average rainy afternoon quite nicely.

View all my reviews